Lummi Ferry Dock Location Options at Gooseberry Point

Three options for improving Lummi Island ferry terminal facilities at Gooseberry Point are being considered as part of the County’s ferry system improvement project. Each option has substantial long-term financial, operational and other pros and cons. This paper by Protect Lummi Island Community (PLIC) summarizes some key aspects of these ferry terminal options.

The process for moving forward is for LIFAC, assisted by Public Works, citizens impacted by these options and the County’s consultants who are assisting with this project, to continue gathering and discussing pros and cons via meetings, an upcoming survey and comments submitted by individuals and groups. After analysis of all information, LIFAC will submit a recommendation (note: LIFAC decides nothing; it is just an advisory committee) along with all Consultant reports to the County Council. The County Council is the ‘decider’ on a preferred docking option, as well as replacement ferry.

Right-sizing Lummi Island Ferry – Demand and Capacity

A choice must be made about the size of the replacement Lummi Island ferry. PLIC-White-Paper-3-Demand-and-Capacity-Options- summarizes the planning consultants’ estimated demand for vehicle transport in the decades ahead, especially during ‘peak normal use’, generally commuting periods. It also describes how three larger ferries might accommodate that vehicle traffic.  All three ferries could be operated with 3 crew members (larger vessels would require adding a 4th crew member, thereby increasing labor costs by 30%).  There are trade-offs among these options on capital and operational costs, as well as on vehicle wait times when vehicle traffic is heavy.

Lummi Island Ferry Advisory Meeting 4-11-2018

2018-04-11-LIFAC-agenda, including time and location

Every month, the Lummi Island Ferry Advisory Committee (LIFAC, a county-appointed members from both on and off island) meets to discuss issues related to the Lummi Island Ferry. These meetings are open to all and include a period at the beginning for 3-minute comments by attendees. Meetings are usually held at the Fire Hall on Lummi Island and once a quarter in Bellingham at the Whatcom Public Works building.

The Lummi Island Ferry System is part of Whatcom County’s road and transportation system, administered by Public Works. Operations are paid for partly by ferry user fees, county road taxes, some state funds, occasional grants.

Update on 2018 Plan to replace Chief, Gooseberry Dock

More on the upcoming recommendations on Whatcom County’s planning to replace the Gooseberry Pt Dock and Whatcom Chief. Important stuff. If you want to have input, the next 3 months are crucial. Stu Rich, President of Protect Lummi Island Community, just sent out this summary.
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From:
Date: Sat, Mar 17, 2018 at 12:23 PM
Subject: PLIC – Stuart Rich- President letter on 3/14/18 Ferry Meeting
To: PLICEBlast

PLIC- Stuart Rich-President

The ferry consultant, KPFF Consulting, and Whatcom County Public Works have laid out their options for a ferry replacement boat (20, 28 or 34 car capacity vessel) and the future Gooseberry ferry terminal location (1.the present location, 2. move north to convenience store location, or 3. purchase up to 8 private homes). Now it’s up to us to decide what is in the best interest of Lummi Island and chose a ferry replacement system that will serve our future needs through the year 2060.

Let’s start with a priority decision- location of the Gooseberry terminal. Staying at the present location is not viable. Lummi Nation has served us due notice that there will be no renewal of the present-day lease. The second option of the convenience store location would mean the continuation of expensive upland and tideland leases with the Lummi Nation which would continue to impact operational costs and fares. The third option of purchasing private homes coupled with a tradeoff – changing the county- right-of- way to accommodate the proposed Lummi Nation marina in exchange for the Nation’s support for a federal right-of-way over the tidal water dock area – would forever eliminate the need for lease payments to the Lummi Nation. This option is cost effective and provides a permanent solution
.
Choosing a long-term replacement boat is a complex process which is directly tied to the level of service (LOS), operational costs and fares, as well as the future growth of Lummi Island. How big of a boat do we need? After examining several studies, KPFF has pegged Lummi Island’s annual growth rate for pedestrian/passenger ridership at 1.54% and vehicle ridership at 0.76 percent through the year 2040. After factoring in current peak ferry usage, the consultants have projected a low- middle- and high range for the required boat capacity through the year 2060.

LIFAC Meeting Tuesday, 12/5/2017

Tonight, 6:30, Fire Hall. (Agenda below)  Rich Hudson, Senior Ferry Master, will report on ferry operations and maintenance plans. Main focus of meeting is progress update on ferry system improvement project, including more ridership data and islander input from November 2017 PLIC meeting.

LUMMI ISLAND FERRY ADVISORY COMMITTEE AGENDA
December 5, 2017, starting at 6:30 p.m.
At the Lummi Island Fire Hall, 3809 Legoe Bay Road, Lummi Island, WA

CALL TO ORDER at 6:30 PM
ROLL CALL
FLAG SALUTE
OPEN SESSION
During open session attendees can speak on any topic. Each speaker will state his or her name for the record and will have three (3) minutes to address the Committee. The Committee requests that individuals intending to speak during public comments please submit the comments in writing for a compilation of public records.
APPROVAL OF MINUTES
11/7/17 regular meeting
OLD BUSINESS
1. Update from Richard Hudson, Senior Master of the Whatcom Chief
1.1. Operations
1.2. Update on dock repairs and plans
2. Update on Ferry System Improvement Project (Middleton)
3. Discussion of 11/16/17 public meeting participation and questionnaire
results
4. Update on consulting work (KPFF Project Manager Cassandra
Shoenmakers)
4.1. Current project status
4.2. Review of task summaries to date
4.3. Input from community questionnaires
5. Traffic data status (Skehan and Bailey)
6. Draft of letter to State Representatives about proposed ferry district
legislation
NEW BUSINESS
1. Skagit ferry design concepts public meeting on Guemes Island (Bailey)
2. Discussion of possible Ferry System Improvement Project phases (Ging)
ADJOURN

Progress on Updating Lummi Island Ferry System: Level of Service

On Tuesday January 3, 2017, the Lummi Island Ferry Advisory Committee (LIFAC) will review the latest draft of their proposal to update the ferry ‘level of service’ (LOS) definition at their meeting at the Lummi Island Fire Hall (6:30-7:50 PM).  2017-01-03-lifac-agenda-and-draft-los-proposal.  The public is invited to provide input on the draft proposal during the comment period at the start of the meeting (3 minute limit per person), in writing including  email, and at the Protect Lummi Island Community (PLIC) annual meeting on January 17, 2017 at the Beach School auditorium.

After public input, LIFAC will finalize and vote on the LOS proposal. That proposal will then be presented to the County Council for consideration at the earliest possible date. This is the crucial next step in moving forward with plans to update the Lummi Island ferry system, including a new ferry, dock modifications (probably replacement) and ferry terminal improvements (e.g., parking).  The step after that will be to request funding from the Council for the detailed work, including financial estimates, needed to form a feasible action plan.Read More »

Lummi Island – Fairhaven Route

UPDATE May 17,2016:  Nancy Ging, LIFAC member, clarified the origins of this draft document on NextDoor Lummi Island (private site). The draft report is not part of LIFAC-County current long-range planning for any future changes to the ferry system. (re-posted with her permission).

There is NO Fairhaven proposal currently under discussion, or even hinted. This report, initiated at the request of a County Councilmember, is intended only to summarize some of the major obstacles encountered by the County, LIFAC, and other citizen groups in the past when the recurring idea of a Fairhaven route was fully explored and rejected. It is not intended to be comprehensive or complete. The report is in draft form and is being submitted for public input, which will be attached to the report before storing it in the archives at the Library.”

Original post May 14, 2016. The Lummi Island Ferry Advisory Committee (LIFAC) has produced a detailed draft report on the feasibility of docking at Fairhaven (DRAFT–Ferry Service Lummi Island to Fairhaven, April 30, 2016). Chuck Antholt, who researched and authored the report, presented it at the May 3, 2016 meeting. The report makes two key assumptions: 1) use of the Whatcom Chief; and 2) no restrictions on docking at Fairhaven (unlikely, given recent input from the Port of Bellingham).  LIFAC requests citizen input on the report (written preferred) at or before their June 7 meeting (email: lummiferry@googlegroup.com or comment at the meeting).

 

LIFAC Progress on Ferry Replacement Planning

Here’s Stu Clark’s (chair) report on the LIFAC March 1, 2016 meeting (not included: Agenda; brief bios of members Bailey, Blake and Forbes). A key action was the vote to ensure that the County’s 20 yr Comprehensive (Comp) Plan recogizes the Lummi Island Ferry system as an essential ‘arterial’ road that requires ‘concurrency’ of future transportation and growth/development. Read More »

Report on Feb. 2, 2016 LIFAC Meeting

Below is a concise report on what happened last night’s Lummi Island Ferry Advisory Committee (LIFAC) meeting. It’s just a quick report, not approved  minutes. Stu Clark sent it out by email today (Feb. 3). Stu is the newly elected LIFAC chairperson. Other newly elected officers and members are listed in the report. The report provides a quick look- ahead to topics for the March 1 meeting.  My sincere thanks to LIFAC for getting these out so quickly! Read More »